News & Posts

Lincoln Knew Idaho Too

Remarks by David H. Leroy, former Lt. Governor and Attorney General on the occasion of the Idaho Day Ceremonies before the Idaho State Senate, March 3, 2016.

Lincoln statue south of the Idaho Capitol building – Boise, Idaho

At 4:30 in the afternoon, Friday, April 14, 1865, Abraham Lincoln is sitting in the Presidential Office on the second floor of the Executive Mansion in Washington, D. C.  Seated at the end of a long oak table on which he had signed the Emancipation Proclamation two years earlier, Lincoln turns slightly to his right and gazes out the window across a grassy expanse at the stump at the Washington Monument, only one-third constructed.

Seated across the table is William Wallace, the Delegate to Congress from Idaho Territory.  Wallace is speaking about politics in Idaho.

Abraham Lincoln has 15 hours to live.

Lincoln Knew Idaho in 1848, as a Congressman, when he voted three times to exclude slavery from the Oregon Country which would one day include our State.

Lincoln Knew Idaho in 1849, as an office seeker, when he was offered and declined the governorship of Oregon Territory which then covered this area.

Lincoln Knew Idaho in 1858, as a debater against Douglas, when he urged that the land and the people here should remain “Forever Free.”

Lincoln Knew Idaho, but he does not know that he has only 15 hours to live.

Lincoln Knew how Idaho got its name in 1862, for he attended the meeting held in Wallace’s residence when it was chosen.

Lincoln Knew that the Idaho Bill almost did not pass on March 3, 1863 when the Senate nearly ran out of time to vote as midnight approached.

Lincoln Knew Idaho as he signed the legislation creating Idaho Territory at 4 in the morning on March 4, 1863.  What a Territory it was – some 310,000 square miles — an area larger than Texas, spanning from Washington to the Dakotas, from Canada to Utah.

As Wallace speaks, Lincoln knows the 15 men, some his closest political allies and associates, whom he appointed to Idaho territorial offices.

Lincoln knows the detail of our territorial organization, for he reported to Congress in his annual messages of 1863 and 1864 about our rich mineral wealth, great distances, and Indian hostilities.

Lincoln knows Idaho best through the man across the table – William Wallace, the former Governor of Idaho Territory, now elected by its people to be their Delegate to Congress.

They have been friends since the 1840’s.  Lincoln knows Wallace so well he calls him by the nickname, “Old Idaho”.

With 15 hours to live, Lincoln is listening to Wallace explain the need to fill a vacant position on the Idaho Supreme Court and in the U.S. Marshall’s post.

Wallace slides two recommendation letters across the table, and on one Lincoln writes nearly the last written communication of his life:

“Let the within appointment be made.  April 14, 1865   A. Lincoln”

Concluding the interview, Lincoln tells Wallace to come back on Monday to  receive the commissions as wished.  Standing, Lincoln then moves around his table, approaches Wallace, pats him on the shoulder and says, “Old Idaho, how would you and Mrs. Wallace like to come to Ford’s Theater with Mary and me tonight?  We are going to see a play called Our American Cousin.”

As they parted, Lincoln has 15 hours to live, the Chief Executive moving toward history and his iconic status as America’s greatest president.

Wallace merely went home, to attend his sick wife and to the agony of wondering, for the next 14 years, what might have happened had he been present in the theater box that night.

Lincoln’s future plan to visit the West, California and perhaps even Idaho, after he completed his second term also was lost that night.

So too was William Wallace’s dream to finish his service in Congress, to move home to Idaho, build a residence on two lots of land which he had acquired in Boise City and live out his days among the neighborly pioneers who then walked the streets which surround where this Capitol building sits now.

Idaho celebrates its relationship with Lincoln in its public places and its public spaces, like this Senate Chamber.

The oldest Lincoln statue in the Western U.S. sits just 100 yards in front of this building.

The largest public room in this Capitol is called the Lincoln Auditorium.

The most significant museum exhibit in the world celebrating Lincoln and the Rocky Mountain West can be found at our Idaho Archives Building on Old Penitentiary Road.

The sixth or seventh largest statue of Lincoln in the nation, some 13 feet tall if the seated figure stood erect, is located in Julia Davis Park, adjacent to Boise’s Black History Museum.

Finally, we celebrate Idaho Day, annually each March 4th, to remember the event 154 years ago, when Lincoln took his pen in hand and with the strokes of his signature, created Idaho Territory.

As we today know Lincoln, be assured,with certainty, Lincoln Knew Idaho Too.

KIVI-TV Channel 6 News – Idaho’s Abe Lincoln Exhibit Highlighted In Honor of His Birthday

As seen on KIVI-TV Channel 6

by: Tammy Scardino
6:24 PM, Feb 11, 2017

Go to the KIVI TV’s site and watch the video by clicking on the image.

BOISE – The Gem state might not exist if it weren’t for Abraham Lincoln.

The Idaho State Historical Society hosted a birthday celebration for the former U.S. president on Saturday, and they invited a local Lincoln scholar to speak on Abe’s behalf. Dave Leroy penned a letter from Lincoln to President Donald Trump offering some advice while facing a divided nation.

“Honest Abe” advised Trump to keep his promises to the America people and to not be fearful of using the executive order, among other things.

“He might advise to knock off the tweets,” Leroy said. “Abraham Lincoln had a habit of writing angry letters to his general or to people who had disappointed him. But, he took those angry letters and put them in the bottom drawer of his desk and wrote on them never signed, never sent.”

Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809 and served as the nation’s 16th president.

The exhibit that highlights his special relationship with Idaho is located inside the Idaho State Archives building off of Old Penitentiary Road in Boise.

February 18, 2017 Wine & Politics with Dave Leroy – What Would Lincoln Say to Trump – (Capitol Cellars Restaurant)

“WHAT WOULD LINCOLN SAY TO TRUMP”

Abraham Lincoln’s advice from 150 years ago is startlingly relevant to today’s issues.

  • Saturday, February 18 @ Noon-
  • Lunch & 1 glass of Wine-
  • 110 S. 5th St., Boise, ID
  • RESERVATIONS?
  • 208.344.WINE (208.344.9463)
  • $16.43/person

Brochure: Wine & Politics with Dave Leroy


SPEAKER – Dave Leroy, President and Founder of the Idaho Lincoln Institute, is scheduling a limited number of speaking engagements to share Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom and how these timeless principles are important to embrace at this pivotal time in our Nation’s history. Please go to this link to learn more about having Dave speak at your event.

What Would Abraham Lincoln Say to Donald Trump?

WHAT WOULD ABRAHAM LINCOLN SAY TO DONALD TRUMP?

Since 1989, each outgoing American president has left a private letter of comments and advice in the Oval Office for their incoming successor.  What a treasure trove of history the Nation would have if this tradition had started with George Washington, instead of Ronald Reagan.  Even better it would be, if a far-past presidents of unique and relevant experience could whisper in the ear of a future Chief Executive in challenging times.

Abraham Lincoln in 1861, elected with under 40% of the vote, inherited a politically divided Union.  He was pushed into a Civil War with domestic terrorists, propelled toward budget deficits and faced a balky Congress and a conflicted Supreme Court.

Donald Trump in 2017, chosen by 46% of the ballots, faces the political division of civil unrest, a war with international insurgents, spiraling spending, a Congress which has too long delayed solving critical issues and a deadlocked Supreme Court.

To be sure, today’s contrast between Red States blockaded on both East and West by Blue States is not comparable to yesterday’s catastrophic secession of Slave States in the South. Further, Lincoln and Trump are very different men.  One, at age 70, has a fine college education and no political experience.  The other, then 51, was a former state legislator and congressman with first grade level formal schooling.

The times too are vastly different.  Modem communication for Trump is instantaneous on the internet.  For Lincoln, it was the telegraph.  It took Lincoln 13 days to journey from Springfield to Washington by rail as President-elect.  Mr.   Trump flew from New York in less than an hour.

Nevertheless, Lincoln 16 may well have valuable insights for Trump 45 to prevent the current culture clash from erupting into a second civil war.  Knowing that California may be on the verge of declaring itself a “sanctuary state,” Lincoln may well have written:


THE EXECUTIVE MANSION

WASHINGTON

Dear Donald:

Though I left the Executive Mansion a Century and a half ago, custom permits me to leave a word of advice.  The same gap of time between us permits you to freely disregard it.

You are a builder, I merely a lawyer.  I suspect that your administration will commence with a flurry of reconstruction.

Strong cabinet appointments are a necessity.  One might say I relied upon a team of rivals.  I am certain that your choices, like mine, will be swiftly confirmed by the Senate.

I faced and surmounted a great Civil War.  Circumstances have forced upon you a great civil unrest.  Let not criticism deter you from a required path.

Prioritize the nation’s needs, but be flexible, strategic.  My only purpose was to save the Union.  I would have freed some, all or none of the slaves to do that. In time, I accomplished both freedom and union.

Let Congress legislate, but fear not the issuance of Executive Orders.  My edicts were the essence of saving a Nation: Draft calls to muster troops, suspending habeas corpus to preserve the peace, emancipation to win the war.

Take care to guard the Constitution – ultimately it, and the Declaration of lndependence which enables it – are our gift to the world and ourselves.

If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author.  As a Nation of free men we will live forever, or die by suicide.

Issue not any proclamation in haste or heat of anger.  While a bird may “tweet” with impunity, a President must preside, most often, above the fray.  My custom of placing my “hot” letters in a desk drawer, “Never Sent,” “Never Signed,” served the country well.

Finally, keep faith – keep your promises made to the electorate.  We Republicans are a new and ever emerging party and must build, not dissipate the base.  Remember always, this is a government of the people, by the people, for the people.

Your Truly,

A. Lincoln


SPEAKER – Dave Leroy, President and Founder of the Idaho Lincoln Institute, is scheduling a limited number of speaking engagements to share Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom and how these timeless principles are important to embrace at this pivotal time in our Nation’s history. Please go to this link to learn more about having Dave speak at your event.

Lewiston Tribune – Appealing the Marty Trillhaase Jeer – Lincoln & Trump

As printed in the Lewiston Tribune on February 16, 2017

I earned a Tribune “jeer” under the pen of Mr. Trillhaase February 10th when he relied upon a story incompletely reported in the Idaho Falls Post Register that I had proposed Lincoln and Trump to be “comparable” presidents in like circumstances. The journalist writing that story heard my rhetorical question, “What woould Abraham Lincoln say to Donald Trump?” Unfortunately, he headed back to the press room before listening to the answer, and thus under reported the entire point of my exercise. Marty correctly noted that the Trump45 inaugural speech did not soar to the heights of noble concept and phasing found in Lincoln”s second inaugural of 1865. However, this observation precisely underscores the point made in my remarks and by my printed column below – Lincoln’s coaching is needed now!I appeal the jeer…………….Dave Leroy


WHAT WOULD ABRAHAM LINCOLN SAY TO DONALD TRUMP?

Since 1989, each outgoing American president has left a private letter of comments and advice in the Oval Office for their incoming successor.  What a treasure trove of history the Nation would have if this tradition had started with George Washington, instead of Ronald Reagan.  Even better it would be, if a far-past presidents of unique and relevant experience could whisper in the ear of a future Chief Executive in challenging times.

Abraham Lincoln in 1861, elected with under 40% of the vote, inherited a politically divided Union.  He was pushed into a Civil War with domestic terrorists, propelled toward budget deficits and faced a balky Congress and a conflicted Supreme Court.

Donald Trump in 2017, chosen by 46% of the ballots, faces the political division of civil unrest, a war with international insurgents, spiraling spending, a Congress which has too long delayed solving critical issues and a deadlocked Supreme Court.

To be sure, today’s contrast between Red States blockaded on both East and West by Blue States is not comparable to yesterday’s catastrophic secession of Slave States in the South. Further, Lincoln and Trump are very different men.  One, at age 70, has a fine college education and no political experience.  The other, then 51, was a former state legislator and congressman with first grade level formal schooling.

The times too are vastly different.  Modem communication for Trump is instantaneous on the internet.  For Lincoln, it was the telegraph.  It took Lincoln 13 days to journey from Springfield to Washington by rail as President-elect.  Mr.   Trump flew from New York in less than an hour.

Nevertheless, Lincoln 16 may well have valuable insights for Trump 45 to prevent the current culture clash from erupting into a second civil war.  Knowing that California may be on the verge of declaring itself a “sanctuary state,” Lincoln may well have written:


THE EXECUTIVE MANSION

WASHINGTON

Dear Donald:

Though I left the Executive Mansion a Century and a half ago, custom permits me to leave a word of advice.  The same gap of time between us permits you to freely disregard it.

You are a builder, I merely a lawyer.  I suspect that your administration will commence with a flurry of reconstruction.

Strong cabinet appointments are a necessity.  One might say I relied upon a team of rivals.  I am certain that your choices, like mine, will be swiftly confirmed by the Senate.

I faced and surmounted a great Civil War.  Circumstances have forced upon you a great civil unrest.  Let not criticism deter you from a required path.

Prioritize the nation’s needs, but be flexible, strategic.  My only purpose was to save the Union.  I would have freed some, all or none of the slaves to do that. In time, I accomplished both freedom and union.

Let Congress legislate, but fear not the issuance of Executive Orders.  My edicts were the essence of saving a Nation: Draft calls to muster troops, suspending habeas corpus to preserve the peace, emancipation to win the war.

Take care to guard the Constitution – ultimately it, and the Declaration of lndependence which enables it – are our gift to the world and ourselves.

If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author.  As a Nation of free men we will live forever, or die by suicide.

Issue not any proclamation in haste or heat of anger.  While a bird may “tweet” with impunity, a President must preside, most often, above the fray.  My custom of placing my “hot” letters in a desk drawer, “Never Sent,” “Never Signed,” served the country well.

Finally, keep faith – keep your promises made to the electorate.  We Republicans are a new and ever emerging party and must build, not dissipate the base.  Remember always, this is a government of the people, by the people, for the people.

Your Truly,

A. Lincoln

 

 

February 11, 2017 Presentation – What Would Lincoln Say to President Trump – (Idaho State Historical Society)

MEDIA ADVISORY

For Immediate Release

February 6, 2017

Contact: Patricia Hoffman

(208) 334-2682

patricia.hoffman@ishs.idaho.gov

IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATES ABRAHAM LINCOLN’S BIRTHDAY

BOISE, ID – Happy Birthday Mr. Lincoln! Celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s birthday on Saturday, February 11 at the Idaho State Archives (we are celebrating on Saturday due to his birthday falls on Sunday). Join us at Noon for remarks by David Leroy, “What Would Lincoln Say to President Trump”, the advice that history suggests Lincoln would give to President Trump at the outset of an administration in a divided country and a president who got fewer than 50% of the popular vote.

View the A. Lincoln: His Legacy in Idaho exhibit, an extraordinary collection gifted by David and Nancy Leroy. Cake and refreshments will be served and self-guided tours will be available.

  • Saturday, February 11
  • Noon – 2:00 p.m.
  • Idaho State Archives: 2205 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, Idaho 83712

SPEAKER – Dave Leroy, President and Founder of the Idaho Lincoln Institute, is scheduling a limited number of speaking engagements to share Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom and how these timeless principles are important to embrace at this pivotal time in our Nation’s history. Please go to this link to learn more about having Dave speak at your event.

February 12, 2017 Panel Discussion – Comparing Presidents Lincoln & Trump (Boise Public Library)

Abraham Lincoln 208th Birthday Panel Discussion in Boise:

“Comparing the Situations of Presidents  Lincoln and Trump at the Onset of their Respective Administrations”

Contact: F.W.Krone 208-854-9197 or

Idahorememberslincoln@gmail.com

For Immediate Release: January 24, 2017

CELEBRATE THE 208TH BIRTHDAY OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN on February 12 in Boise, Idaho with a lively discussion by noted experts.

WHAT: Panel discussion at the Boise Public Library featuring former Idaho Lt. Governor David Leroy, the Honorable Stephen S. Trott (Senior Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the NInth District) and Lincoln presenter Skip Critell.

WHEN:    Sunday, February 12, 2017,   Noon-1:30 pm

WHERE: 

Boise Public Library,

3rd Floor, Marion Bingham

Room, 715 S. Capitol Blvd – Boise, Idaho

PANELISTS:

  • Former Lt. Governor and Attorney General David H. Leroy
  • The Honorable Stephen S. Trott (Senior Circuit Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth District.)
  • Skip Critell, Abraham Lincoln presenter for Idaho

ABOUT:

The program will start with a historical review by Senior Circuit Judge Stephen Trott on Lincoln’s first month in office, followed by David Leroy’s address of the comparative issues facing President Trump under the title “What Would Lincoln Say to Trump?” After the discussion there will be a photo opportunity with Skip Critell as Abraham  Lincoln. Program Sponsors include the Idaho Lincoln Institute (looktolincoln.org) and the Idaho Civil War Roundtable (idahocivilwar150commission@gmail.com).


SPEAKER – Dave Leroy, President and Founder of the Idaho Lincoln Institute, is scheduling a limited number of speaking engagements to share Abraham Lincoln’s wisdom and how these timeless principles are important to embrace at this pivotal time in our Nation’s history. Please go to this link to learn more about having Dave speak at your event.

Lincoln And Mexico Project (LAMP) – “Idaho Loves Lincoln”

As posted on the Lincoln And Mexico Project (LAMP) Blog…

December 13, 2016

( goto the LAMP Blog-Post… )


Idaho former Lt. Gov. David H. Leroy with original Lincoln court brief, Lincoln statue in Boise park, signage for Lincoln exhibit at Idaho State Archives.

Abraham Lincoln is revered coast to coast in the USA, especially by historians and politicians who look to his life for guidance. Because of this, historian/ educator Michael Hogan has been invited to Boise, Idaho, in 2017 to present his book Abraham Lincoln and Mexico, which forms the basis of the Lincoln and Mexico Project (LAMP).

The invitation comes from former Lt. Gov. David H. Leroy, who has launched the Idaho Lincoln Initiative (ILI) to further Lincoln’s fundamental principles. You can learn more about it at http://looktolincoln.org/. Both ILI and LAMP share a common goal of informing and educating people about Lincoln’s legacy and accomplishments, although the LAMP focuses on international relations with Mexico.

Leroy, who also served as Idaho Attorney General, is the author of Mr. Lincoln’s Book, an authoritative examination of Lincoln’s writings about the Lincoln-Douglas debates. At the Idaho State Archives, he has donated more than 200 personal Lincoln artifacts to create the Abraham Lincoln Exhibit.

Lincoln’s statue near the Capitol building in Boise honors his signing the act creating the Idaho Territory in 1863. Another Lincoln statue looms large in a nearby park honoring one of Boise’s founding families.

We’ll keep you updated as the Idaho event takes shape. Meanwhile, please post a comment to let us know if you or someone else in your city might be interested in hosting an event to help spread the word about Lincoln’s legacy.

DAVE LEROY: What to Make of a Crazy Election

By David Leroy

As published by the Idaho Statesman on November 12, 2016
As published by the Idaho Statesman on November 12, 2016

What a night! Call it historic, amazing, depressing, unprecedented — pick your own adjective. Here are my takeaways from an epic election evening:

1. Unpopularity drives turnout, too. A survey last week concluded that 82 percent of likely voters nationwide distrusted both candidates. With 125 million votes cast, the second-most in U.S. history, voting against someone or for the lesser of evils proved a superior motivation.

2. Can’t fool all of the people all of the time. Americans waited eight years for the “Hope and Change” promised by President Barack Obama over two election cycles. Almost nobody in America wanted a third term of Obama, which Hillary came to represent for many voters, especially as the president hit the campaign trail for her so prominently in the closing weeks.

3. The bottom line is money. People still do and probably always will vote their pocketbooks. The best simple explanation for why the liberal, central, blue states flipped red is that Trump’s jobs message struck home.

4. Polling is neither an art nor a science. Boy did the prognosticators miss the call! Hours before the polls closed, based on their trusted field data, many respected pollsters were predicting a 340-vote Clinton electoral landslide. Obviously, new methodologies are needed.

5. Ignorance trumps illegality. The Republican nominee said impolitic words, exhibited ugly attitudes, did disqualifying acts. However, the specter of significant and lingering criminal entanglements, gross and continuing untruths and the Clinton disregard for the rule of law ultimately pushed away more voters than did the Trump offenses.

6. Conventions are archaic, perhaps parties, too. Though much heralded as the keystone of every national campaign, neither convention spectacle foreshadowed much about the issues or strategies that played out over the ensuing months. The fractured political parties were marginalized, especially when some of the formerly faithful, including historic leaders, endorsed or voted across party lines.

7. No spoilers this time. In Idaho, eight separate presidential tickets appeared on our ballots. The 5 percent of popular votes garnered nationally by third-party candidates, if redistributed in key states, could have altered the outcome. However, because such parties were positioned on both the liberal and conservative edges of the political spectrum, no one is yet claiming that they either spoiled or made a victory. They simply held both major candidates under 50 percent.

8. The lawyers stayed home. The margin of electoral victory was wide enough and distributed throughout a sufficient number of states that neither candidate dispatched a bevy of lawyers to the airport to begin legal challenges over “hanging chads” and miscounted ballots. That is a good thing for America.

9. No media honeymoon for trump. CNN was the first network to call a Trump victory, at about 12:41 a.m. Mountain time, 19 minutes to midnight in North Idaho, when they awarded him Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes. The president-elect took the stage in New York City a little while later. Fewer than 10 minutes after his gracious speech, the commentators on MSNBC were citing various provisions of the U.S. Constitution that will necessarily preclude a President Trump from achieving the programs and promises he has made.

10. Trump seems educable. The address to supporters and the national audience struck all of the proper conciliatory, inclusive, hopeful messages achieving a presidential tone. He stayed on teleprompter script, with a minimum of ad libs. That was a promising start.

11. Pardon me? Barack Obama has already begun to vigorously exercise the presidential pardon power. Invoking the precedent of Presidents Ford and Nixon, as the 44th chief executive exits, I believe that he will absolve both Hillary and former President Bill Clinton from any and all crimes they may have committed in their recent public and private lives. That won’t stop the parade of revelations or prevent other legal consequences, but it will make Foundationgate a sideshow, rather than a national preoccupation.

We have again accomplished the peaceful revolution and transfer of political power under our Constitution. Hillary Clinton made a warm, strong and encouraging morning-after concession speech. Trump begins holding both our nation’s hopes and its fears. God bless America.

Boise attorney David H. Leroy is a former Idaho attorney general and lieutenant governor.

IDAHO STATESMAN: After election, time to allow our ‘better angels’ to ‘now come together’

The Idaho Statesman Editorial referenced and quoted Abraham Lincoln…

President Abraham Lincoln’s first inaugural address came as the nation was on the brink of civil war. We, fortunately, do not face civil war, but rather are on the brink of a new beginning. Yet we can learn from Lincoln’s words and do our part to foster unity as we move forward:

“We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

 

Full Editorial…

As printed in The Idaho Statesman on 11/12/2016

Though we are not asking anyone to forget or even forgive the unfortunate acrimony that surfaced during the long and contentious race for the White House, we hope all Idahoans and Americans understand it is time to move on and do what is best for our nation.

President-elect Donald Trump said as much Wednesday morning when delivering a gracious and inclusive speech after his victory. His opponent, Hillary Clinton, continued that patriotic and conciliatory tone Wednesday afternoon in her moving concession. Before detailing her personal disappointment, Clinton said: “Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and a chance to lead.”

President Barack Obama followed that theme Thursday during his meeting with Trump, emphasizing that the caustic partisan edge of campaign politics must give way to the agenda of preserving and protecting our union: “We must now come together, and work together.”

“Now come together” is a fitting guidepost in the interim as our leaders work through the transition of power and our nation attempts to heal — or at least put into perspective — some of the wounds of the campaign.

After wishing his bitter GOP rival, Trump, success as president Thursday, Ohio Gov. John Kasich called the statements of Obama and Clinton “inspirational” because they placed country above politics, a winning path to the future over the ditches that would mire us in defeat. We could not agree more.

It is a matter of record that the Idaho Statesman Editorial Board preferred Clinton in a nearly unanimous endorsement — and unanimously shunned Trump for a variety of reasons. But the people in Idaho and throughout the country had the final word at the polls Tuesday, selecting Trump as our 45th president.

We honor the people’s choice above all, it is the American way. The office of president deserves our ongoing respect — and the person who occupies it our support, especially between now and the Jan. 20 inauguration, when the whole world, including our allies and enemies, observes this transition.

We have no illusions: Trump will disappoint you and us with a policy decision we don’t like. All presidents do. But we understand leadership is about making thoughtful decisions that benefit the body, though not every appendage at first might agree.

But before we get to the point of exercising our duty to scrutinize those presidential decisions in the give-and-take of governing, Trump and his team deserve our good will and the benefit of the doubt in order to establish a foundation.

We support anyone’s right to peaceful protests, dissent and to express disappointment about the election results. But we equally denounce the violence of those acting out against a new president who was duly elected, and who has yet to even take the oath of office.

President Abraham Lincoln’s first inaugural address came as the nation was on the brink of civil war. We, fortunately, do not face civil war, but rather are on the brink of a new beginning. Yet we can learn from Lincoln’s words and do our part to foster unity as we move forward:

“We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

Unsigned Editorial Board opinions express the consensus of the Statesman’s editorial board. To comment on an editorial or suggest a topic, email editorial@idaho statesman.com.