Lincoln on Amending the Constitution

“I wish now to submit a few remarks on the general proposition of amending the Constitution. As a general rule, I think we would much better let it alone. No slight occasion should tempt us to touch it. Better not take the first step, which may lead to a habit of altering it. Better, rather, habituate ourselves to think of it as unalterable. It can scarcely be made better than it is. New provisions would introduce new difficulties, and thus create and increase appetite for further change. No, sir; let it stand as it is. New hands have never touched it. The men who made it have done their work, and have passed away. Who shall improve on what they did?”

Speech in Congress, June 20, 1848

“Don’t interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. And not to Democrats alone do I make this appeal, but to all who love these great and true principles.”

Speech at Kalamazoo, August 27, 1856

 


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One thought on “Lincoln on Amending the Constitution”

  1. I would defer to Lincoln even though I have dared to write 85 proposed ‘improvements’. I especially like the amendment about how to establish a minimum wage IF THERE IS ONE.

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